my-ear-trumpet:

welovepaintings:

Herbert Gustave Schmalz (1856-1935)Faithful Unto DeathOil on canvas1888Private collection

The reverse of the painting has a caption written by Schmalz, reading “The Sect who were first called Christians at Antioch had / that day born good witness to their faith, in Rome. There in / the fierce glare of the Arena, waiting for the end. / Waiting, under the pitiless eyes of a blood-thirsty multitude, from Senator and patrician dame, to low baffoon & parisite. Waiting, till fear becomes/hope, & shame grows shameless before the promise of Death!” / Herbert Schmalz, 49 Addison Road, Kensington, London.” (Wikipedia)
“It is the feast of Bacchus, and the pillars are painted red and ornamented with emblems of his worship, [although] the active rites are more fitted to please Moloch than the light-hearted consoler of Ariadne. Tier upon tier of expectant faces rise around the amphitheatre, whose floor is soft sand and whose ceiling the wonderful purple ‘valerium’ embroidered with the stars of the sorrowing heavens. Negro slaves clad in red and white direct a few late-comers to their seats. The Roman soldiers rest on their spears at the entrance, beside which sit some foreign ambassadors or guests of the great Caesar … Great thought and skill have been bestowed on the architectural and archaeological detail, every point being carried out with unfailing conscientiousness, as shown by the vine leaf half-hidden in the sand and the bleached leg bones of some previous butchery unearthed by the chariot wheels of the passing Emperor.”— Trevor Blakemore (1911) The Art of Herbert Schmalz London: G. Allan & Co , pp. 44–46 (Wikipedia)

my-ear-trumpet:

welovepaintings:

Herbert Gustave Schmalz (1856-1935)
Faithful Unto Death
Oil on canvas
1888
Private collection

The reverse of the painting has a caption written by Schmalz, reading “The Sect who were first called Christians at Antioch had / that day born good witness to their faith, in Rome. There in / the fierce glare of the Arena, waiting for the end. / Waiting, under the pitiless eyes of a blood-thirsty multitude, from Senator and patrician dame, to low baffoon & parisite. Waiting, till fear becomes/hope, & shame grows shameless before the promise of Death!” / Herbert Schmalz, 49 Addison Road, Kensington, London.” (Wikipedia)

“It is the feast of Bacchus, and the pillars are painted red and ornamented with emblems of his worship, [although] the active rites are more fitted to please Moloch than the light-hearted consoler of Ariadne. Tier upon tier of expectant faces rise around the amphitheatre, whose floor is soft sand and whose ceiling the wonderful purple ‘valerium’ embroidered with the stars of the sorrowing heavens. Negro slaves clad in red and white direct a few late-comers to their seats. The Roman soldiers rest on their spears at the entrance, beside which sit some foreign ambassadors or guests of the great Caesar … Great thought and skill have been bestowed on the architectural and archaeological detail, every point being carried out with unfailing conscientiousness, as shown by the vine leaf half-hidden in the sand and the bleached leg bones of some previous butchery unearthed by the chariot wheels of the passing Emperor.”— Trevor Blakemore (1911) The Art of Herbert Schmalz London: G. Allan & Co , pp. 44–46 (Wikipedia)

Reblogged from my-ear-trumpet